FAQ

FAQ

What should I bring to my appointment?

Please fill out the new patient forms that can be downloaded online. These can be filled out ahead of time, which will streamline your initial visit to the office.

If you are coming for a surgical consultation the following information will be very helpful to your surgeon:
Reports and a disc of any recent radiologic evaluations, such as a CT scans.
If you have had previous surgeries, a copy of your operative reports.
Any pertinent pathology reports.

What if I am experiencing a medical emergency after hours?

A colon and rectal surgeon from this office is on call 24-7 to handle emergencies that may arise after hours.

What if I need a prescription renewed?

Call the office to request a refill of your medication or have your pharmacy send a refill request. If you have not been seen in the office in over a year, the doctor may request you be seen in the office first.

What is your financial policy?

Patients with insurance:
We will submit a claim to your insurance company and once the claim has been settled, we will notify you of any financial responsibility.

Patients without insurance:
Payment is due at the time services are rendered

Do you participate with my insurance plan?

Our doctors are in-network with Medicare and some private insurance companies. Since all insurance plans are different, it is best to contact your insurance carrier for an explanation of your benefits or contact our office for more specific details.

How Does The Affordable Care Act affect me?

The Affordable Care Act is a policy that affects all Americans and the way they access healthcare as a result of their insurance. Ultimately, knowing the details of your insurance plan is your responsibility. The following is our provider status:

BLUE SHIELD ANTHEM BLUE CROSS PPO MEDICARE
Dr. Moore Dr. Moore Dr. Moore
Dr. Madsen Dr. Madsen Dr. Madsen
Dr. Magner Dr. Magner Dr. Magner
Dr. Sokol

California Colorectal Surgeons are NOT providers for any of the health insurance plans purchased  through Covered California.  If you choose to see one of the doctors in this office you wil have to use your “out of network” benefits.  If you have purchased an EPO policy through Covered California , you have NO  “out of network” benefits and subsequently have NO coverage with our doctors.

If this is your situation, we may be able to find a payment option that will be acceptable to you. If you would like to discuss your situation with our office call us at: (310) 854-3580.

Which colorectal cancer screening test is right for me?

You should have a colonoscopy if any of the following describes you:
*Screening for colon and rectal cancer. Everyone at or over the age of 50, without any risk for polyps and cancer, should have a screening colonoscopy. If you have risk factors for colon cancer, your doctor may recommend earlier colonoscopy. African Americans have a higher risk and death rate from colon cnacer than any other ethnic group. The exact reason isn’t known. African Americans should begin screening colonoscopy at the age of 45 rather than the age of 50.

*Unexplained abdominal symptoms
*Anemia or low blood count
*Tested positive for blood in the stool
*Unexplained diarrhea
*Rectal bleeding
*Change in bowel habits
*Suspicion of inflammatory bowel disease such as Ulcerative Colitis or Crohn’s disease

What are the symptoms of colorectal cancer?

It is important to understand that the most common symptom of colorectal cancer and polyps is no symptoms at all. Colorectal cancer is known as a “silent” disease, because many people do not develop symptoms, such as bleeding or abdominal pain until the cancer is difficult to cure. In fact, the possibility of curing patients after symptoms develop is only about 50%. On the other hand, if colorectal cancer is found and treated at an early stage, before symptoms develop, the opportunity to cure is 80% or better. This is the reason screening colonoscopies are important.

Where do CCS physicians perform surgery?

Depending on the procedure, our doctors schedule surgeries at Cedar Sinai Medical Center and several private out-patient surgery centers near our office.

Why should I get screened for colorectal cancer?

It is important to understand that the most common symptom of colorectal cancer and polyps is no symptoms at all. Colorectal cancer is known as a “silent” disease, because many people do not develop symptoms, such as bleeding or abdominal pain until the cancer is difficult to cure. In fact, the possibility of curing patients after symptoms develop is only about 50%. On the other hand, if colorectal cancer is found and treated at an early stage, before symptoms develop, the opportunity to cure is 80% or better. This is the reason screening colonoscopies are important.

What are current recommendations for the prevention of colorectal cancer?

Colonoscopies are the single most important tool for prevention of colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer screening begins at the age of 50 or starting at the age of 40 for individuals who are experiencing rectal bleeding or have a first-degree relative (parent or sibling) with colon cancer or polyps should start their colon cancer screening at the age of 40. The goal is to identify the potential for disease or the condition early when it is easier to prevent or cure.

Modifiable lifestyle risks factors include:
-Tobacco consumption
-Alcohol consumption
-Physical inactivity
-Diet high in red meats & animal fats
-Low fiber diet

What is inflammatory bowel disease?

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) refers to a group of conditions in which an abnormal immune response leads to chronic, relapsing inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis are the two most common diseases in which this occurs. Although both diseases have similarities, it is important to distinguish between the two, because the appropriate surgical treatment, if needed, depends on accurately diagnosing which disease is causing the underlying inflammation. IBD is often confused with IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome) due to the similar names. IBS or “spastic colon” is not an inflammatory disorder but rather a disorder relating to bowel’s function, which may lead to either bouts of diarrhea or constipation. IBS can be differentiated from IBD by its lack of bowel inflammation and the two disease groups are not related and not treated in the same way.